Watch Out For IRS Scams

There are many identity theft schemes that use the IRS name in order to get your personal information. They come to you through unsolicited phone calls, unsolicited emails from the IRS (Internal Revenue Service).  Be careful because you are not talking to the IRS like you may think that you are.

There have been over 200 complaints about phishing schemes reported to the Internet Crime Complaint Center since 2006. These phishing schemes falsely use the IRS name as bait. Now the scammers have new tricks up their sleeves. They use personalized email greetings, the promise of tax rebates, sometimes threats to get you to give up your personal information. Don’t fall for these tactics.

Don’t give out your personal information to anyone that you have not contacted yourself. If they say that they are the IRS then call the IRS for yourself to verify their claims before you give out your information.

Don’t fall for these IRS scams:

Scam # 1. Tax Refund Emails

The scammers will use the IRS name & logo in an email to fool you. Contact the IRS if you receive one of these emails to verify if the IRS really did send you the email. The IRS name & logo may look real but look closely at the footer on the bottom of the email it will have a copyright 2008, IRS U.S.A. That may look real but it usually is copied and pasted onto the email. Most scams come from overseas and have a lot of misspelled words, incorrect grammer etc…

Also the subject line may have “Notice From the IRS” and have IRS in the domain name. Some emails will have a link in the email for you to click in order to claim your refund. Don’t click this link.  If you do it will take you to a fake IRS claim form for you to fill out with all of your personal information. They want your social security number or the numbers of your family members, credit card numbers, address and/ or your bank account information.

That gives a wealth of information to criminals. The scammers will use it for identiy theft or sell it on the black market. Don’t get so curious to click the link in these emails because you just may download malware onto your computer which will hunt for your personal information. “Curiousoty killed the cat”

The IRS will not use emails to tell you about your refunds or rebates. If you are expecting a refund or rebate check out the IRS, Where’s My Refund Tool to locate your refund.  Report fake emails & phishing scams to phishing@irs.gov .

  • IRS Tax Forms 1-800-892-3676
  • IRS 24Hour/ 7 days Tax Info, Refund Status 1-800-829-4477
  • IRS Tax Help Line (Individuals)1-800-829-1040,(Business)1-800-829-4933
  • IRS Refund Hotline 1-800-829-1954
  • IRS Tax Fraud Violations 1-800-829-0433
  • National Taypayer Advocate 1-877-777-4778
  • Tax Exempt Government Entities 1-877-829-5500 

Scam # 2. Rebate Phone Calls

For many years there have been fake phone callers who impersonate IRS employees. They tell you that you can get your rebate early for filing your taxes early. The scammers will ask for your bank account information and if you refuse then they will deny your refund. That’s a lie so don’t fall for it.  The scammers will use current events in American Government to fool you. They are using the recently passed rebate legislation by Congress as a con.

If you get one of these phone calls just hang up the phone and call the IRS for yourself to check it out.  Your real notification of a rebate will come in a letter from the IRS not an email.  Checks will start coming out in May.  If you want your money direct deposited you must include it in your tax return.

Scam # 3. Check Verification Phone Calls

A fake IRS employee calls consumers telling them that the IRS mailed them a check that you haven’t cashed and ask for your bank account information. The IRS will never call you about not cashing a check. The IRS doesn’t mind if you don’t cash it right away. To see what’s happening to your rebate check out the IRS, Where’s My Refund Tool.

Lesson To Learn :

The IRS communicates with taxpayers through the U.S. Postal mail. To report fake scams, fake phone calls and emails to phishing@IRS.gov .

Scam # 4. Audit Emails

Audit emails is a new scam which will threaten you or scare you into giving up your personal information. They tell you that your refund will not be granted to you because your tax refund is being audited. It also includes a link to a fake form for you to fill out.

These emails will greet you by your name. They get this information from social networking sites and hacked computers to target their emails.

The IRS does not send out unsolicited emails or phone calls.

Clerical Business Solutions

Renee-Virtual Assistant  Email: info@clericalsolutionsinc.net

Web: http://www.clericalsolutionsinc.net   

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